Cotton Textiles Industry An Annotated Bibliography

COTTON TEXTILES INDUSTRY: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 6

Dattel, G., (2011). Cotton and Race in the Making of America: TheHuman Costs of Economic Power. New York. Ivan R. Dee.

In this book, Dattel begins by describing the history of cottonproduction in the USA. Historians believe that cotton was importedinto the USA from Europe. By 1540, Native Americans were alreadygrowing cotton. The growth of cotton elicited the demand for slaves.Even after the abolishment of the slave trade, African Americansstill formed the largest ethnic group of cotton field workers. Themechanization of cotton production in the 1920’s saw the massmigration of African Americans from the Southern states to theNorthern states. This source is important because it provides thefoundation for the discussion of cotton in the USA. It alsohighlights the racial tension due to mechanization.

Aamar., S. (2012). Risk Analysis of the Pakistani TextileIndustry: A Macro Analysis. Laurea University of Applied Science,retrieved From, &lthttps://publications.theseus.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/43815/Final_Thesis_Aamar%20Sohail.pdf?sequence=1&gt

The research paper talks about the problems that the Pakistanitextile industry is facing. Some of the problems mentioned thereinare universal to all cotton- producing countries. The major problemfacing the Pakistani textile industry is the energy crisis. Thesector requires more energy than the country can produce. Althoughthe USA does not have an energy crisis in its textile industry, thetype of energy used is not sustainable for the future. Otherchallenges include corruption, price fluctuations, politicalinterests and inflation. This paper is relevant because it shows thesimilarity of problems experienced in the textile industry across allcountries.

Bernstein., L. (2001). Private Commercial Law in the CottonIndustry: Creating Cooperation Through Rules, Norms, andInstitutions. Chicago: University of Chicago Law School.

The cotton industry has replaced the old, complex system of privatecommercial law with a more customized one. The law that governs thepurchase and sell of cotton between merchants and mills is notgoverned in the uniform commercial code. The parties to a legalcontract in the cotton business draft their own conditions that willbe enforceable by law. Some big corporations take advantage of thisloophole to fleece farmers and millers of their money. The article isrelevant to this discussion because it reveals some of the legalproblems common in the textile industry.

Correia, V., M. (2008). Characterization of textile wastewaters ‐a review. Environmental technology 15(10).

The absolute mechanization and utilization of fossil fuels in thetextile industry has led to increased pollution. The group ofresearchers sought to establish the kind of pollutants in textilewastewaters. They conducted laboratory tests on textile wastewatersfrom various textile industries in the USA. Results showed that thewastewater contains toxic chemicals such as non- biodegradable,highly colored dyes, and pesticides used in growing cotton. Thearticle is important because the textile industry has been on thelimelight for its role in the pollution of the environment. Thefindings of the research paper indicate that indeed textilewastewater is harmful.

DeSimone, J., M. (2002). Practical Approaches to Green Solvents.Science 297, (5582) 799-803

Solvents are widely used in the commercial production of goodsincluding cotton. No matter the level of precaution, these solventsmanage to find their way into the soil, water and plant life. Thepaper proposes the use of less solvent in the industry by reducingthe number of processes that require the use of inorganic solvents.The paper also proposes the use of more efficient recycling methods.This paper is relevant to this topic because it highlights theopportunities in sustainability in the textile industry. Although yetto be implemented, the strategy is economically viable andsustainable in the end.

Bale, J., S, van Lenteren, J., C, Bigler, F., (2008). Biologicalcontrol and sustainable food production. PhilosophicalTransactions R Society of London Biology 363(1492)

The researchers provide the alternative methods to chemicalpesticides in the growth of crops (cotton included). Among theproblems facing the cotton growing are pests. The use of biologicalmethods to control pests can take three forms- Classical control,augmentative control, integrated pest management. The use ofbiological methods has proved to be as efficient as the chemicalmeans. This source is important for this subject because ithighlights solutions to one of the major problems facing theproduction of cotton. The toxic pesticides used by cotton farmershave found their way into living systems. Bio control is a goodalternative.

Muneer, T., Maubleu, S., Asif, M., (2006). Prospects of solar waterheating for textile industry in Pakistan. Renewable andSustainable Energy Reviews 10(1) 1-23.

Water heating is among the processes that consume the most energy intextile industries. The primary idea behind water heating is to drythe cotton. Pakistan is a major powerhouse in the production ofcotton, uses enormous amounts of fossil fuel for water heating. Theintroduction of solar water heating will cut down on the productioncost and reduce the rate of pollution. The article is relevantbecause it reveals sustainable production methods that have workedthus far. It is a high time other textile- producing countriesborrowed a leaf from Pakistan.

Qaim., M, Zilberman., D. (2003). Yield Effects of GeneticallyModified Crops in Developing Countries. Science 299(5608) 900-902

The number one problem facing cotton farmers is pest infestation.Pests reduce the yield of cotton plants by almost 25%. The scientificpaper describes the results from conducting field trials forgenetically modified cotton. The cotton has a gene from a bacteriumcalled Bacillus Thuringiensis that infects insect pests. Fieldtrials showed that indeed the incorporation of the BT toxin genereduces the risk of infestation. The paper is important for thisdiscussion because it shows that some methods for sustainableproduction of cotton have worked. Not all proposals are merespeculation as the media portrays them.

References

Aamar., S. (2012). Risk Analysis of the Pakistani TextileIndustry: A Macro Analysis. Laurea University of Applied Science,Retrieved From,&lthttps://publications.theseus.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/43815/Final_Thesis_Aamar%20Sohail.pdf?sequence=1&gt01 February, 2015

Bale, J., S, van Lenteren, J., C, Bigler, F., (2008). Biologicalcontrol and sustainable food production. PhilosophicalTransactions R Society of London Biology 363(1492) 761-776

Bernstein., L. (2001). Private Commercial Law in the Cotton Industry:Creating Cooperation Through Rules, Norms, and Institutions.University of Chicago Law School.

Correia, V., M. (2008). Characterization of textile wastewaters ‐a review. Environmental technology 15 (10). 917-929

Dattel, G., (2011). Cotton and Race in the Making of America: TheHuman Costs of Economic Power. New York: Ivan R. Dee.

DeSimone, J., M. (2002). Practical Approaches to Green Solvents.Science 297, (5582) 799-803

Muneer, T., Maubleu, S., Asif, M., (2006). Prospects of solar waterheating for textile industry in Pakistan. Renewable andSustainable Energy Reviews 10(1) 1-23.

Qaim., M, Zilberman., D. (2003). Yield Effects of GeneticallyModified Crops in Developing Countries. Science 299 (5608) 900-902

Close Menu